National Society Colonial Dames of the XVII Century

California State Society

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WILLIAMSBURG CHAPTER

The Williamsburg Chapter was organized September 8, 1950 and chartered May 24, 1952. The chapter holds its meetings on the 3rd Friday in February and September.

The chapter is named for Williamsburg. Prior to the arrival of the English colonists at Jamestown in the Colony of Virginia in 1607, the area which became Williamsburg was within the territory of the Powhatan Confederacy. By the 1630s, English settlements had grown to dominate the lower (eastern) portion of the Virginia Peninsula, and the Powhatan tribes had abandoned their nearby villages. Between 1630 and 1633, after the war that followed the Indian Massacre of 1622, the English colonists constructed a defensive palisade across the peninsula and a settlement named Middle Plantation as a primary guard station along the palisade.

Jamestown was the original capital of Virginia Colony, but was burned down during the events of Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. As soon as Governor William Berkeley regained control, temporary headquarters for the government to function were established about 12 miles (19 km) away on the high ground at Middle Plantation, while the Statehouse at Jamestown was rebuilt. The members of the House of Burgesses discovered that the 'temporary' location was both safer and more pleasant environmentally than Jamestown, which was humid and plagued with mosquitoes.

A school of higher education had long been an aspiration of the colonists. An early attempt at Henricus failed after the Indian Massacre of 1622. The location at the outskirts of the developed part of the colony had left it more vulnerable to the attack. In the 1690s, the colonists tried again to establish a school. They commissioned Reverend James Blair, who spent several years in England lobbying, and finally obtained a royal charter for the desired new school. It was to be named the College of William & Mary in honor of the monarchs of the time. When Reverend Blair returned to Virginia, the new school was founded in a safe place, Middle Plantation in 1693. Classes began in temporary quarters in 1694.

If you are interested in Membership in the chapter which meets in the Los Angeles area, provide your name and email address with your potential ancestor to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century
1300 New Hampshire Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036-1595
Phone: (202) 293-1700
Web Site: www.colonialdames17c.org